The Mill Pond Conservation Area (Perth) Trails Review

***Please click on this link Map Locations of ALL Trails on this Site to view a map with the location of every trail “2oldguyswalking” has written a review on.***

 

The Mill Pond Conservation Area (Perth) Trails Review 

The most straight forward way to get here from the 401 is to head North on Hwy 15 out of Kingston. Turn left on Briton Houghton Bay Rd (Reg Rd 38). About five kms along, you’ll see the well marked entrance. Or you can hit the link below to open Google Maps at the location, and determine your own route.

https://maps.app.goo.gl/mEU2L2vBBSJUobww9

We first visited here in late April and we loved the one trail we had time to walk. We do that in the off seasons to assess whether or not to return in the Summer. We returned in late June to do a review.

Funny thing is … we preferred it in the Spring before the leaves were out. So, the pictures you’ll see of the blue trail in this review, will include the April shots I took, as well as the June pictures. Both the Red and the Blue trails have clear views of water in the Spring, but the viewing becomes more limited later in the season.

There are some buildings (sugar shack, utility, a picnic table shelter, and such) near the large, free parking area. There’s also a permanent privy near the parking lot.

The Orange Trail (1.9 kms) 

This one is basically a bush road until you hit the place where the Red trail splits off from it. From there, it’s a pleasant, woodsy, single file walk. There is a short offshoot trail to an old lime kiln, and there’s a small water crossing with a beaver dam.

The Yellow Trail (700 meters) 

A pleasant walk through the woods which we used as a link to the blue trail in April.

The Red Trail (1.8 kms) 

This one had a number of wet spots at the start, and in June, we could just get around them. Then it rose up to a high and dry forest full of stately old beech trees … then the hills started. Many, very steep, short hills. The footing was difficult as the trail base was mostly rocks and roots. Kinda rough on the ankles, but not impossible. You’ll want to stop to look around, and you will want to look around ‘cause there are lots of water viewing opportunities on this (mostly single file) trail.

The Blue Trail (2.3 kms)  

This was the trail we walked in both April and June. In April, we watched a beaver working on its lodge and heard a loon calling in the distance. The South East length of this loop is fairly level and through a wooded area with a shortcut to the Yellow Trail. This shortcut seems to be the more popular way to get back to the parking lot though there’s a water view on this stretch. The North West length is quite hilly but has lovely views of the two ponds (better in April than June).

The Blue Trail in April

The Blue Trail in June

The Final Take 

While most people prefer Summer walking, we found these trails nicer before or after the leaves. The water views are plentiful, but are reduced considerably by foliage between the trails and the water in the Summer months. Otherwise, the trails are pretty enough, though generally quite hilly and wet in some places. Some of the trail bases are very rocky and “rooty”, so you’ll need to watch your step in places. The trail widths vary between single file, and two walking at the shoulder. Dogs are permitted. There’s ample free parking, washroom facilities, and sheltered picnic facilities.

Have a nice walk,

Bushwhacker

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